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Trainees' Newsletter

Monday, 05 December 2011 10:17

The New JAG Trainee Certification Process

Tuesday, 03 May 2011 08:57

Dear Trainee,

Over the last 18 months, the JAG has carried out an extensive review and consultation on the way that trainees are assessed as competent at endoscopy. This article aims to inform you of the changes, provide you with the rationale for the changes and give you a timeline for implementation.

Firstly, the term accreditation is changing to certification to help distinguish this process from the endoscopy unit accreditation process.

Trainees have fed back that the application process for certification can be paper heavy and cumbersome. In response to this, the JAG have designed and released the JETS e-portfolio. From mid March 2011 the application process will be streamlined; you will be able to apply through the JETS e-portfolio. From September 2011, all applications will have to be submitted through the JETS e-portfolio. If needed, supplementary paper evidence will be permitted until at least 2012.

If you are not sure whether your trust has set up the JETS e-portfolio click on this link:

Details on how to set up the JETS e-portfolio can be found here:

 

Independent EWTD Review

Wednesday, 16 June 2010 12:36

Issued by the News Distribution Service on behalf of NHS Medical Education England (MEE)

Professor Sir John Temple has launched his report ‘Time for Training’, an independent review of the impact of the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on the quality of training for doctors, dentists, pharmacists and healthcare scientists.

The report was commissioned by Medical Education England (MEE) at the request of the former Secretary of State for Health Alan Johnson.

Sir John’s report concludes that high quality training can be delivered within the reduced number of hours available but fails if trainees:

  • have the major role in providing out of hours service;
  • are poorly supervised; or
  • have limited access to learning.

'Time for Training' focuses on the quality of training provided now and says any current problems will not be solved by either increasing hours or lengthening training programmes.

The Review reveals that, despite an increase of more than 60 percent in consultant numbers over the past ten years, hospitals remain too reliant on junior doctors to provide out of hours services.

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