Media & Press

World experts reveal the secrets of food intolerance to Birmingham patients

At a special evening hosted by the British Society of Gastroenterology, leading experts discuss the causes of food intolerances, how food can affect the way you feel and quality of life and new approaches to dealing with food related illnesses.

Almost 3 in 100 people in this country find that a particular food can give them unpleasant symptoms ranging from skins reactions to breathing difficulties to vomiting or diarrhoea. But Dr Nick Read from The Gut Trust argues food allergies may not necessarily be specific immunological or biochemical reactions to particular food components, but could often represent thoughts and memories associated with particular foods.

 

Case Study: Amanda and Rick

Amanda and Rick had been going for some time and when he suggested dinner out one evening, she felt particularly excited. The venue was perfect; a little fish restaurant in a village nearby; they chose the salmon with prawns. They had just finished dinner when Rick blurted out he'd been having an affair with a woman in his office who was now pregnant. Amanda went home immediately, where she was seized with the most violent diarrhoea and vomiting, which continued for three days. Subsequent to the attack of gastroenteritis on that fateful evening, she developed an 'allergy' to fish so that even the smell of fish made her violently ill. She then went for tests saw which all came back negative. In desperation, she went to see a psychotherapist and was able for the first time to talk about her symptoms. It was only then that her condition improved.

Dr Nick Read says:

"Over 50% of people in this country claim to suffer from food allergy or intolerances yet medical tests establish a diagnosis in less than a tenth of them. But food intolerances are more than just a stereotyped bodily reaction to a specific food. They are the response of the whole person; mind, body and, meaning to his or her environment. The message is don't just test for the food but look for other explanations and we hope by understanding this, people can have a better relationship with food without the fear and worry that often currently comes with it."

Prof Chris Hawkey of the British Society of Gastroenterology says:

"Most of us enjoy food but for some food intolerance can make life a misery. Sometimes it's a sign of a significant disease like Coeliac disease. In others it may be an allergy or the bowel may be particularly sensitive to individual foods. We are delighted to bring a range of speakers from across the world who will guide those who attend understand food and the gut better and help them to manage their symptoms."

The event is taking place today from 5.30pm -7.30pm and is open to all those who would like to understand how food can affect them and their health. They will also be able to hear from patient charities Coeliac UK and the Gut Trust.

'Food Intolerance and Symptoms of the Gut' will be taking place Tues 15th March, 5.30pm - 7.30pm in Hall 8, International Convention Centre, Birmingham. To attend, simply register your details here This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

NOTES

'Food Intolerance and Symptoms of the Gut' will be taking place Tues 15th March, 5.30pm - 7.30pm in Hall 8, International Convention Centre, Birmingham.

The British Society of Gastroenterology is an organisation focused on the promotion of high standards for clinical services, research, training and education in gastroenterology and hepatology within the UK. It has over three thousand members drawn from the ranks of physicians, surgeons, pathologists, radiologists, scientists, nurses, dietitians, and others interested in the field. Founded in 1937 it has grown from a club to be a major force in British medicine.

For further information please contact:

Surinder Kaur Gill at Luther Pendragon on This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or 0207 618 9100 / 07940488253