BSG

BSG Response to White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People'

Responses to Public Health White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England'

Submitted 31st March 2011

BSG Response

Joint Response

The organisations that contributed to the joint response are:

  • The British Association for the Study of the Liver
  • The British Society of Gastroenterology
  • The British Liver Trust
  • The Hepatitis C Trust
  • Alcohol Concern
 

Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders (EPT)

Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders Defined in High Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT)

High resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) is an evolutionary technology incorporating the combination of high resolution manometry (HRM) and pressure topography plotting in the form of Clouse plots introduced in 2000 for the clinical evaluation of esophageal motility. Prior to that, EPT had been developed and utilized as a highly innovative research modality. The HRM Working Group first met in San Diego during DDW 2007 with the objective of adapting EPT to the clinical evaluation of esophageal motility. Since then, a series of HRM Working Group meetings have ensued on a more-or-less annual basis to review, critique, and plan the iterative process of developing a practical classification for esophageal motility disorders based on EPT-specific metrics and criteria. The classification scheme was initially branded 'The Chicago Classification' in 2007 following a series of seminal publications defining key EPT metrics and interpretation criteria optimized for clinical EPT studies emanating from a group of investigators at Northwestern University in Chicago. Since then, two iterations of the Chicago Classification have been published summarizing the incremental development of the classification scheme. The most recent meeting of the HRM Working Group was in Ascona, Switzerland in conjunction an international congress focused on the clinical evaluation of esophageal disease. This paper summarizes the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders emanating from the meeting at the Ascona congress.

 

Specialty Certificate Examination

The Exam: The BSG, in partnership with the Federation of Royal Colleges of Physicians of the UK organises and delivers the Specialty Certificate Examination in Gastroenterology. The first examination was held in 2008. The examination is currently held in April every year.

UK Trainees: The Specialty Certificate Examination (SCE) is a compulsory component of assessment for Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) for all UK trainees. The examination compliments workplace-based assessments and ensures that trainees have sufficient knowledge to practice safely and competently as consultants.

Outside the UK: The SCE is open to all doctors who are in training or have completed their training from any part of the world. Applicants are no longer required to hold the MRCP (UK). The exam is a computer-based test and is held in several centres throughout the world.

Date of SCE Examination: The next Gastroenterology SCE Examination will take place on 27th April 2017. UK registration period: 29th December 2016 - 23rd March 2017. (European registration period: 29th December 2016 - 26th January 2017).

Dr Mounes Dakkak
Lead Specialist for Gastroenterology SCE

   

BSG guidance on the use of faecal calprotectin testing in IBD

Updated guidance document on use of faecal calprotectin – both in assessment of GI symptoms, and also in patients with known IBD.

Dr Barney Hawthorne, Chair BSG IBD Section Committee, October 2016.

Differentiation between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gut disorders, and the determination of mucosal disease activity in established cases of IBD remain the cornerstones of disease diagnosis and management. Non-invasive, accurate biomarkers of gut inflammation are needed due to the variability of symptoms, the inaccuracies of currently available blood markers and the cost and invasive nature of endoscopy. Numerous biomarkers have been used and/or considered with some in current use...

 

PHE Notice - Re: Shortage of hepatitis B vaccines - recommendations for national clinical directors

Dr. Mary Ramsay and Dr Sema Mandal
Immunisation, Hepatitis, Blood Safety and Countermeasures Response

There is a global shortage of hepatitis B vaccine which is currently impacting severely on the UK supply. The situation is particularly critical during August but limitations on supply are likely to continue until early 2018. To ensure that stock is available for those individuals at highest and most immediate risk of exposure to hepatitis B, Public Health England (PHE) has developed temporary recommendations to support clinicians undertaking an individual risk assessment.

PHE and Department of Health (DH) have been working with both vaccine manufacturers to institute ordering restrictions according to customer type. The allocation is based on an agreed assessment of the proportion of vaccines used by that provider type for individuals in the highest priority groups. As a consequence, some providers may not be able to order any stock and others will have limits applied to their orders. A mechanism will be in place, however, to allow for exceptional orders if there is an urgent and immediate need for an individual following an individual risk assessment.

NHS Hospital Trusts will get the highest allocation, but it has been agreed with the BMA's General Practitioners Committee that general practice will not be able to order any adult hepatitis B vaccine stock until further notice. Because of this, patients requiring post-exposure hepatitis B vaccination will be referred to urgent care or Accident and Emergency based in NHS trusts for an assessment. In addition, specialist services such as liver services, who may normally request that GPs offer hepatitis B vaccination to their patients should note that the GP may not be able to meet this request.

To sustain supply for those at greatest need, all services are being asked to:

  • ensure that clinicians are aware of the temporary recommendations on prioritising vaccines
  • only order essential vaccine stock (small amounts more frequently) and avoid stockpiling
  • coordinate and monitor stock usage across the service to ensure that scarce stock is being used responsibly
  • accept and use alternative products including combined hepatitis A and B vaccines, and other presentations (e.g. multi-dose packs)

The full list of recommendations may be downloaded below:

 
   

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