BSG

NICE Evidence Update: Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

August 2014

A summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 141 'Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: management' (2012)

This Evidence Update provides a summary of selected new evidence published since the literature search was last conducted for the following NICE guidance: Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. NICE clinical guideline 141 (2012) A search was conducted for new evidence from 23 September 2011 to 20 February 2014. A total of 6061 pieces of evidence were initially identified. After removal of duplicates, a series of automated and manual sifts were conducted to produce a list of the most relevant references.

 

Crohn's and Colitis UK Medical Research Awards 2015

Applications are invited for the year 2015 grants to be awarded by Crohn's and Colitis UK. Research Projects may be directed towards any aspect of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Funding will be awarded for periods of up to two years. The grants awarded will normally be up to a maximum of £120,000. Applications for pilot studies under £10,000 are also encouraged.

Closing date for this award will be 27th October 2014.

 

Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

BSG member Sue Clark has recently published a new textbook 'A GUIDE TO CANCER GENETICS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE' which has a significant gastroenterology content.

This book covers the basic concepts of cancer genetics. The common inherited cancer syndromes are each dealt with in greater depth, with the current management outlined. It is aimed at all clinicians who may encounter these conditions in their practice. The book sets out to facilitate identification of high-risk individuals and families, to inform interaction with geneticists and other sub-specialists, to provide a basis for patient management and to stimulate interest in these fascinating conditions.

View Flyer / Purchasing Details [ 38 Kb ]

Publication date: June 2009

   

BSG Guidance on Coeliac Disease 2010

The Management of Adults with Coeliac Disease

Summary

There is clear evidence that coeliac disease is a common gastrointestinal disease affecting up to 1% of the adult population. Individuals may go undetected for many years. This is despite multiple presentations to both primary and secondary care. This may reflect that fact that affected individuals have subtle gastrointestinal symptoms or no gastrointestinal symptoms.

An active case finding strategy will increase the number of patients detected with coeliac disease. Testing for coeliac disease should incorporate an IgA level, Tissue Transglutaminase antibody and/or Endomysial antibody (depending on what is locally available). In patients with a positive antibody a duodenal biopsy should be undertaken to confirm the presence of villous atrophy. In patients who are antibody negative but the clinician is suspicious then a duodenal biopsy should still be undertaken having ensured that the patient is not on a self-imposed gluten-free diet (GFD).

The cornerstone of treatment is a GFD. Patients require regular dietetic support with the opportunity or access to a gastroenterologist should further problems arise. Follow-up may be in primary or secondary care as long as the support is adequate (as noted previously).

In patients with persisting symptoms they should be investigated carefully with particular reference to ensuring that refractory coeliac disease is excluded.

 

BSG Response to White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People'

Responses to Public Health White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England'

Submitted 31st March 2011

BSG Response

Joint Response

The organisations that contributed to the joint response are:

  • The British Association for the Study of the Liver
  • The British Society of Gastroenterology
  • The British Liver Trust
  • The Hepatitis C Trust
  • Alcohol Concern
   

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