BSG

seAFOod Polyp Prevention Trial re-opens

26 Sept 2014
After a period of several months when recruitment was hampered by drug supply problems, this important chemoprevention trial set in the English Bowel Cancer Screening Programme (BCSP) will be fully open for recruitment again in BCSP sites across England. Trial investigators: please be on the look-out for 'high risk' polyp cases needing one-year surveillance colonoscopy from the first week in October onwards. The Trial now needs to recruit a minimum 20 participants per month for the next 18 months or so in order to reach target. Together, we can prove that the BSG and BCSP can host large, practice-changing drug trials such as this. A big thank-you to all contributing to the Trial.
Mark Hull (Chief Investigator)

 

New Evidence Update on Crohn's disease from NICE

An Evidence Update on Crohn's disease has been published by NICE.

NICE Evidence Updates help to reduce the need for individuals, managers and commissioners to search for new evidence and keep health and social care professionals up-to-date with new research. While Evidence Updates do not replace current accredited guidance and do not provide formal recommendations, they do highlight new evidence that health and social care professionals may wish to consider alongside current guidance.

The new Evidence Update focuses on a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 152 'Crohn's disease: management in adults, children and young people' (2012).

Feedback on the Evidence Update may be sent to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

 

Free-to-view webinar 'Constipation in children and young people: implementing the NICE quality standard'

MGP, the publisher of Guidelines and Guidelines in Practice has produced free-to-view webinars for healthcare professionals to help them keep up to date with best practice and maintain their guideline-related learning.

Constipation in children and young people: implementing the NICE quality standard

The webinar will be presented by Dr Hasan Chowhan and Lynne Watson on Wednesday 22nd October, 2 - 3pm and will:

  • Discuss the NICE quality standard on constipation in children and young people
  • Provide a GP perspective on implementing best practice

Details of all our webinars, both live and on demand, and how to register for them can be found at: http://www.eguidelines.co.uk/events. Further information: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

   

Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

BSG member Sue Clark has recently published a new textbook 'A GUIDE TO CANCER GENETICS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE' which has a significant gastroenterology content.

This book covers the basic concepts of cancer genetics. The common inherited cancer syndromes are each dealt with in greater depth, with the current management outlined. It is aimed at all clinicians who may encounter these conditions in their practice. The book sets out to facilitate identification of high-risk individuals and families, to inform interaction with geneticists and other sub-specialists, to provide a basis for patient management and to stimulate interest in these fascinating conditions.

View Flyer / Purchasing Details [ 38 Kb ]

Publication date: June 2009

 

BSG Guidance on Coeliac Disease 2010

The Management of Adults with Coeliac Disease

Summary

There is clear evidence that coeliac disease is a common gastrointestinal disease affecting up to 1% of the adult population. Individuals may go undetected for many years. This is despite multiple presentations to both primary and secondary care. This may reflect that fact that affected individuals have subtle gastrointestinal symptoms or no gastrointestinal symptoms.

An active case finding strategy will increase the number of patients detected with coeliac disease. Testing for coeliac disease should incorporate an IgA level, Tissue Transglutaminase antibody and/or Endomysial antibody (depending on what is locally available). In patients with a positive antibody a duodenal biopsy should be undertaken to confirm the presence of villous atrophy. In patients who are antibody negative but the clinician is suspicious then a duodenal biopsy should still be undertaken having ensured that the patient is not on a self-imposed gluten-free diet (GFD).

The cornerstone of treatment is a GFD. Patients require regular dietetic support with the opportunity or access to a gastroenterologist should further problems arise. Follow-up may be in primary or secondary care as long as the support is adequate (as noted previously).

In patients with persisting symptoms they should be investigated carefully with particular reference to ensuring that refractory coeliac disease is excluded.

   

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