HSJ Awards 2015: Clinical Leader of the Year - Dr Beverly Oates

Dr Beverley Oates has been awarded the prestigious HSJ Clinical Leader of the Year 2015. The BSG congratulates her on this well deserved recognition.

Dr Oates, Deputy-Chair BSG Training Committee, has been clinical leader for endoscopy at Wirral University Teaching Hospital Foundation Trust for 10 years.

The award cited her implementation of an electronic auditable reporting system in 2006 and expansion of the endoscopy service from two to four theatres in 2008. A seven-day endoscopy service began in 2012 thanks to Dr Oates securing £1.7m to expand the unit further to seven theatres and reconfigure facilities to create single sex environments.



Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

BSG member Sue Clark has recently published a new textbook 'A GUIDE TO CANCER GENETICS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE' which has a significant gastroenterology content.

This book covers the basic concepts of cancer genetics. The common inherited cancer syndromes are each dealt with in greater depth, with the current management outlined. It is aimed at all clinicians who may encounter these conditions in their practice. The book sets out to facilitate identification of high-risk individuals and families, to inform interaction with geneticists and other sub-specialists, to provide a basis for patient management and to stimulate interest in these fascinating conditions.

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Publication date: June 2009


Regional Training Directors Manual

This manual was conceived out of a training and development day for Training Programme Directors in Gastroenterology and subsequent discussions at the Royal College of Physicians in London in September 2007. The event was jointly sponsored by the BSG and the JRCPTB and involved the BSG Training Committee and invited speakers. The content of this manual was derived from the contributors and discussion which followed. These are acknowledged in the appendix box 3.The first version was produced in 2008 and it is updated annually.


BSG Guidance on Coeliac Disease 2010

The Management of Adults with Coeliac Disease


There is clear evidence that coeliac disease is a common gastrointestinal disease affecting up to 1% of the adult population. Individuals may go undetected for many years. This is despite multiple presentations to both primary and secondary care. This may reflect that fact that affected individuals have subtle gastrointestinal symptoms or no gastrointestinal symptoms.

An active case finding strategy will increase the number of patients detected with coeliac disease. Testing for coeliac disease should incorporate an IgA level, Tissue Transglutaminase antibody and/or Endomysial antibody (depending on what is locally available). In patients with a positive antibody a duodenal biopsy should be undertaken to confirm the presence of villous atrophy. In patients who are antibody negative but the clinician is suspicious then a duodenal biopsy should still be undertaken having ensured that the patient is not on a self-imposed gluten-free diet (GFD).

The cornerstone of treatment is a GFD. Patients require regular dietetic support with the opportunity or access to a gastroenterologist should further problems arise. Follow-up may be in primary or secondary care as long as the support is adequate (as noted previously).

In patients with persisting symptoms they should be investigated carefully with particular reference to ensuring that refractory coeliac disease is excluded.


Liver Biopsy Pathway

The attached document offers a "guidance" that you may wish to adapt to suit your local service. It could be a useful template to some units who are formalising or developing a liver biopsy pathway.


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