BSG

Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders (EPT)

Chicago Classification Criteria of Esophageal Motility Disorders Defined in High Resolution Esophageal Pressure Topography (EPT)

High resolution esophageal pressure topography (EPT) is an evolutionary technology incorporating the combination of high resolution manometry (HRM) and pressure topography plotting in the form of Clouse plots introduced in 2000 for the clinical evaluation of esophageal motility. Prior to that, EPT had been developed and utilized as a highly innovative research modality. The HRM Working Group first met in San Diego during DDW 2007 with the objective of adapting EPT to the clinical evaluation of esophageal motility. Since then, a series of HRM Working Group meetings have ensued on a more-or-less annual basis to review, critique, and plan the iterative process of developing a practical classification for esophageal motility disorders based on EPT-specific metrics and criteria. The classification scheme was initially branded 'The Chicago Classification' in 2007 following a series of seminal publications defining key EPT metrics and interpretation criteria optimized for clinical EPT studies emanating from a group of investigators at Northwestern University in Chicago. Since then, two iterations of the Chicago Classification have been published summarizing the incremental development of the classification scheme. The most recent meeting of the HRM Working Group was in Ascona, Switzerland in conjunction an international congress focused on the clinical evaluation of esophageal disease. This paper summarizes the Chicago Classification of esophageal motility disorders emanating from the meeting at the Ascona congress.

 

Specialty Certificate Examination

The Exam: The BSG, in partnership with the Federation of Royal Colleges of Physicians of the UK organises and delivers the Specialty Certificate Examination in Gastroenterology. The first examination was held in 2008. The examination is currently held in April every year.

UK Trainees: The Specialty Certificate Examination (SCE) is a compulsory component of assessment for Certificate of Completion of Training (CCT) for all UK trainees. The examination compliments workplace-based assessments and ensures that trainees have sufficient knowledge to practice safely and competently as consultants.

Outside the UK: The SCE is open to all doctors who are in training or have completed their training from any part of the world. Applicants are no longer required to hold the MRCP (UK). The exam is a computer-based test and is held in several centres throughout the world.

Date of SCE Examination: The next Gastroenterology SCE Examination will take place on 27th April 2017. UK registration period: 29th December 2016 - 23rd March 2017. (European registration period: 29th December 2016 - 26th January 2017).

Dr Mounes Dakkak
Lead Specialist for Gastroenterology SCE

 

BSG guidance on the use of faecal calprotectin testing in IBD

Updated guidance document on use of faecal calprotectin – both in assessment of GI symptoms, and also in patients with known IBD.

Dr Barney Hawthorne, Chair BSG IBD Section Committee, October 2016.

Differentiation between inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and functional gut disorders, and the determination of mucosal disease activity in established cases of IBD remain the cornerstones of disease diagnosis and management. Non-invasive, accurate biomarkers of gut inflammation are needed due to the variability of symptoms, the inaccuracies of currently available blood markers and the cost and invasive nature of endoscopy. Numerous biomarkers have been used and/or considered with some in current use...

   

UK guideline on transition of adolescent and young persons with chronic digestive diseases from paediatric to adult care

Alenka J Brooks, Philip J Smith, Richard Cohen, Paul Collins, Andrew Douds, Valda Forbes, Daniel R Gaya, Brian T Johnston, Patrick J McKiernan Charles D Murray, Shaji Sebastian, Monica Smith, Lisa Whitley, Lesley Williams, Richard K Russell, Sara A McCartney, James O Lindsay

ABSTRACT

The risks of poor transition include delayed and inappropriate transfer that can result in disengagement with healthcare. Structured transition care can improve control of chronic digestive diseases and long-term health-related outcomes. These are the first nationally developed guidelines on the transition of adolescent and young persons (AYP) with chronic digestive diseases from paediatric to adult care. They were commissioned by the Clinical Services and Standards Committee of the British Society of Gastroenterology under the auspices of the Adolescent and Young Persons (A&YP) Section. Electronic searches for English-language articles were performed with keywords relating to digestive system diseases and transition to adult care in the Medline (via Ovid), PsycInfo (via Ovid), Web of Science and CINAHL databases for studies published from 1980 to September 2014. The quality of evidence and grading of recommendations was appraised using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system. The limited number of studies in gastroenterology and hepatology required the addition of relevant studies from other chronic diseases to be included.

These guidelines deal specifically with the transition of AYP living with a diagnosis of chronic digestive disease and/or liver disease from paediatric to adult healthcare under the following headings;

  1. Patient populations involved in AYP transition
  2. Risks of failing transition or poor transition
  3. Models of AYP transition
  4. Patient and carer/parent perspective in AYP transition
  5. Surgical perspective
 
 

Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

BSG member Sue Clark has recently published a new textbook 'A GUIDE TO CANCER GENETICS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE' which has a significant gastroenterology content.

This book covers the basic concepts of cancer genetics. The common inherited cancer syndromes are each dealt with in greater depth, with the current management outlined. It is aimed at all clinicians who may encounter these conditions in their practice. The book sets out to facilitate identification of high-risk individuals and families, to inform interaction with geneticists and other sub-specialists, to provide a basis for patient management and to stimulate interest in these fascinating conditions.

View Flyer / Purchasing Details [ 38 Kb ]

Publication date: June 2009

   

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