BSG

OECD Report: Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use

New OECD Report a reminder that new Government must tackle alcohol crisis with urgency – BSG

BSG alcohol health experts have responded to today's OECD Report by calling on the new Government to introduce a range of measures to address alcohol-related problems, which cost the Government £21bn every year.

The report, Tackling Harmful Alcohol Use: Economics and Public Health Policy, shows that whilst average alcohol consumption is apparently falling in some European countries:

  • Levels of alcohol consumption in the UK are above the OECD average and have increased during the last 30 years
  • The proportion of 15 year olds who have experienced alcohol increased from 71% in 2002 to 75% in 2010
  • In England, the heaviest-drinking 20% of the population drink almost 63% of all alcohol

The BSG has repeated calls for a range of measures to be introduced to address the current crisis, including the introduction of an Alcohol Care Team in every hospital in the country, the introduction of a 50p minimum unit price for alcohol and restrictions of the advertising of alcohol, particularly towards children.

Commenting, British Society of Gastroenterology Alcohol Services Lead, Dr Kieran Moriarty CBE, said:

"This Europe-wide report comes at a critical moment for Britain, and we hope it will act as an urgent reminder to the incoming Government of the need to introduce a range of evidence-based policies to address the crisis we face.

"We have made considerable progress in recent years by increasing the number of Alcohol Care Teams, but we need more service improvements and for the Government to introduce a whole range of measures to address the situation we face.

"Our A&Es and wards are under great pressure and it is no secret that alcohol misuse has a major part to play in this.

"There is not a family in Britain unaffected by alcohol misuse and taking action will save the NHS money and, more importantly, save lives."

 
 

How to be a good Chief Investigator

The MRC Network of Hubs for Trials Methodology Research are giving a free one day training event for newly funded Chief Investigators on randomised clinical trials. The workshop will include panel discussions, presentations from clinical trial units, trial funders and trial methodologists, problem solving sessions and discussions on workshop relationships. This workshop is free to shortlisted applicants, but spaces are limited. A contribution to travel costs will be available for invited delegates. Applicants must be a new CI on a randomised clinical trial which is already currently funded. To apply please email a 2-page CV detailing your career to date and a cover letter containing the title and funder of your trial, and a copy of the trial abstract to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it with the subject heading: “CI workshop 2”. Deadline for applications: 17 July 2015 at 4:00pm.

 

Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

A Guide to Cancer Genetics in Clinical Practice

BSG member Sue Clark has recently published a new textbook 'A GUIDE TO CANCER GENETICS IN CLINICAL PRACTICE' which has a significant gastroenterology content.

This book covers the basic concepts of cancer genetics. The common inherited cancer syndromes are each dealt with in greater depth, with the current management outlined. It is aimed at all clinicians who may encounter these conditions in their practice. The book sets out to facilitate identification of high-risk individuals and families, to inform interaction with geneticists and other sub-specialists, to provide a basis for patient management and to stimulate interest in these fascinating conditions.

View Flyer / Purchasing Details [ 38 Kb ]

Publication date: June 2009

   

BSG Guidance on Coeliac Disease 2010

The Management of Adults with Coeliac Disease

Summary

There is clear evidence that coeliac disease is a common gastrointestinal disease affecting up to 1% of the adult population. Individuals may go undetected for many years. This is despite multiple presentations to both primary and secondary care. This may reflect that fact that affected individuals have subtle gastrointestinal symptoms or no gastrointestinal symptoms.

An active case finding strategy will increase the number of patients detected with coeliac disease. Testing for coeliac disease should incorporate an IgA level, Tissue Transglutaminase antibody and/or Endomysial antibody (depending on what is locally available). In patients with a positive antibody a duodenal biopsy should be undertaken to confirm the presence of villous atrophy. In patients who are antibody negative but the clinician is suspicious then a duodenal biopsy should still be undertaken having ensured that the patient is not on a self-imposed gluten-free diet (GFD).

The cornerstone of treatment is a GFD. Patients require regular dietetic support with the opportunity or access to a gastroenterologist should further problems arise. Follow-up may be in primary or secondary care as long as the support is adequate (as noted previously).

In patients with persisting symptoms they should be investigated carefully with particular reference to ensuring that refractory coeliac disease is excluded.

 

BSG Response to White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People'

Responses to Public Health White Paper: 'Healthy Lives, Healthy People: Our Strategy for Public Health in England'

Submitted 31st March 2011

BSG Response

Joint Response

The organisations that contributed to the joint response are:

  • The British Association for the Study of the Liver
  • The British Society of Gastroenterology
  • The British Liver Trust
  • The Hepatitis C Trust
  • Alcohol Concern
   

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